Items 1 to 10 of 235 total

Johanne Elise “Lizzie” (Schrumpf alternate Shrimpf) Cordes, daughter of Johann Henrich and Catherine Elisabeth (Strothmann, alternate spelling Strophmiann) Schrumpf, was born March 8, 1855, in Miten, Westphalia, Germany, according to the christening records of the Evangelical Church from Germany. She came to New York in 1871 where she met John Henry Cordes, who had also emigrated from Germany. In 1876, John headed west but kept in communication with Lizzie, who remained in New York.

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Mary Elizabeth (Chastain) Cordes was born on September 3, 1888 in Gainesville, Hall County, Georgia, the daughter of William E. and Eugenie (Smith) Chastain. When the 1900 census was enumerated Mary was listed in the household of her grandparents, Sterling and Lizzie Chastine[sic—spelling on census], in Fork, Hall County, Georgia.

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Kate Thomson Cory was born on February 8, 1861, in Waukegan, Illinois, the daughter of James Young and Eliza Pope (Kellogg) Cory.  She was a pioneer in more than the usual sense of the word. She was indeed extraordinary. In May 1887 the New York Herald carried an article titled “PRIZES FOR FEMALE ART STUDENTS,” stating Kate T. Cory had won first prize receiving $30 in gold for her art work from the Art Department of the Cooper Union.  The following year an article in that newspaper showed her as an instructor.  As a single woman at the age of 44, she journeyed alone to the Hopi mesas of Arizona hoping to become a member of a developing artist colony.

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Mary Tapscott (Dailey) Crook was born May 7, 1842, the eldest daughter of John Dailey and Ann Rebecca (Turley) in Romney, Hampshire County, West Virginia. She grew up in Oakland, Maryland, and married General George Crook on August 21, 1865, in Allegany County, Maryland. A short wedding announcement was found in the Wheeling Daily Intelligencer newspaper dated July 25, 1865: “It is announced that within the next few days Maj. General Geo. Crook, lately in command of the Department of West Virginia, will marry Miss Mollie Dailey, of Oakland, Md.”

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Susan “Susie” (Mahony) Crose, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Mahony, was born on April 16, 1890, in Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona Territory.  Her birth and weight of ten pounds were reported in the Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner on April 23, 1890.

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Lottie (Grounds) Crozier was born near Hackberry, Yavapai County, Arizona Territory, on December 18, 1888, the daughter of Melissa (Cureton) and Bud Grounds. She was named for Lottie Cook Miller, a schoolteacher friend of her mother. Lottie had some formal education that was supplemented by home study and reading.  She married Samuel Franklin Crozier, and the couple lived on ranches in California and Colorado, as well as in Arizona.

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Ida Belle “Idelle” (Grumbles) Culley was born on August 15, 1895, in White Oaks, New Mexico, to John Hemphill and Mariam R. (Brooking) Grumbles. Her father died March 10, 1896, leaving her mother a widow with seven children to rear.

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Alice Jane (Donovan) Curnow, the second daughter of Edward and Sarah (McNally) Donovan, was born in Whitefield, Lincoln County, Maine, on February 13, 1861. Edward, an engineer, went to California to work shortly after Alice’s birth, leaving his family in Maine, where he apparently believed his children would receive a better education.  Alice attended a convent school in Whitefield until 1873 and then attended Augusta, Maine schools.

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Maria Julia (Guilio) Defilippi was born June 29, 1875 to Peter and Katherine (Valli) Guilio in San Georgio, Italy. In 1898, the Guilio family emigrated from Italy and settled in Jerome, Yavapai County, Arizona Territory.

Maria married Antonio Defilippi (1868 – 1951) on January 18, 1899. According to her obituary in the Prescott Courier, she was said to be one of the first brides of the Verde Valley.

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Laura Elizabeth (Theobald) Delk was born April 29, 1902, to Phoebe (Lauer) and John Nicholas Theobald in Marietta, Washington County, Ohio. When Laura was two years old, her mother became very ill with what was then known as consumption. The family doctor insisted that Phoebe move to a drier climate, so the family boarded a train to Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona Territory.  There Phoebe made a miraculous recovery.

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