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By Joe Webster

How many of us played “cowboys and Indians” when we were young?  Did we love the western movies when we could tell the good guys from the bad guys?  I suspect that many of us couldn’t wait for the next installment of the Lone Ranger serial.  The western movie was a staple of movie making since the later part of the 19th century.  It continues even today.
 

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By Murray Smolens

Granite City. Goodwin. Audubon. Gimletville. Azatlan. Long-forgotten Arizona ghost towns? Actually, without the determination of first territorial secretary Richard McCormick and his supporters, one of these could have been of the name of the first territorial capital. Instead, the town was named for a now-obscure 19th-century historian who never visited the area.
 

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By Barbara Patton

Last week’s article left Joseph Walker with his tired and weary men high in the Sierra Mountains facing the formidable Yosemite Valley.  Although they tried, they couldn’t find a way to descend to the valley floor, so they followed the western ridge until they found an Indian path leading down the western side of the mountains.  Now able to find game to fuel their famished bodies and with Walker’s assurances the Pacific Ocean was not far away, the men’s spirits lifted.   

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By Barbara Patton

Most Prescott residents know there is a Walker Road named after the man who in 1863 led an expedition up the Hassayampa River in search of gold —  the discovery of which contributed to the founding of Prescott in May 1864.  However, Joseph Rutherford Walker was known for many other accomplishments before he led that last expedition of his career. Most importantly he was a man who garnered great respect from his fellow mountaineers, some of whom became much more famous than the quiet unassuming Joe Walker; although those who knew him proclaimed him one of the best.

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By Erik Berg

In popular culture, beer and whiskey are the traditional drinks of the Old West.  I have yet to see a western movie where the grizzled cowboy bellies up to the bar and asks the barkeep to recommend a nice bottle of wine – perhaps something French – that would pair well with venison and biscuits.  But wine was popular too on the western frontier and often promoted by establishments as a mark of quality and distinction.

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Dodging the Draft

Aug 05, 2017

By Mick Woodcock

When Congress passed the Selective Service Act of 1917, it was in response to an enlistment of 73,000 men when the need was for ten times that amount. The low enlistment rate might have provided a clue as to the popularity of President Wilson’s war, but once the law was enacted, many men enlisted in the branch of their choice rather than waiting to be called up.

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By Brad Courtney

“Prescott has five churches and two school buildings, 18 saloons, two breweries, a City Marshal, is the Capital of the Territory, county seat of Yavapai, and is soon to be lighted with gas,” read the Miner on March 10, 1882. The “City Marshal” listed here as one of Prescott’s sources of pride was James Dodson.

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By David Higgs

The story has been retold many times.  It has been depicted in books and motion pictures to reveal the events that led to the end of the Apache Wars. They tell of the surrender of Geronimo’s band of Chiricahua Apaches to General Nelson A. Miles at Skeleton Canyon, Arizona, September 4, 1886, and the deportation of all Apaches associated with Geronimo to imprisonment in Florida, Alabama, and eventually Oklahoma.  However, the story does not end there.  For these Apache Prisoners of War, it meant a new life of constant change and acculturation as many of these people lived well into the twentieth century.  The world they knew ceased to exist.  As parents, Apache families tried to pass along wisdom and life-skills to their children, only to be contradicted by modern education.  Concepts of legal structure, religion, even the measurement of time proved to be obstacles for the next generation of Apaches.  Their children developed into people alien to the original life-ways of Apache culture.

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By Janolyn Lo Vecchio

In 1912 Arizona women won the right to vote; two years later they elected Francis Willard Munds and Rachel Berry to the state legislature.  Yet while women began voting and serving as state legislators, they were barred from serving on juries until 1945.  In 1914 Maricopa County attorney Frank Lyman refused to seat nine women as jurors in Mesa because the state constitution specified only men could serve on juries.  From 1921-1933, women’s jury service bills were introduced and died in legislative committee hearings.

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Cowgirl Up!

Jul 08, 2017

By Heidi M. Thomas

“…Rearing, bucking, fighting, a frenzied bronco tears at the burden on its back. Claimed by a thousand devils, he kicks and plunges with the fury of the damned. The rider, a woman, is buffeted and tossed like dust in a storm…”

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