Items 1 to 10 of 1042 total

By Brad Courtney

As noted in Part 1, Dan “D. C.” Thorne came to Prescott in 1867. In 1870, he traveled east and “committed matrimony” with Mary Wilson of New Jersey. He opened the Cabinet Saloon on lot 19, 118 Montezuma Street, in 1874 and soon made it the go-to place on the evolving Whiskey Row.
 

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By Brad Courtney

Today he is known to local historians and a few Whiskey Row regulars, but in his day he was a living legend. Dan Conner “D.C.” Thorne has even been called the founder of today’s famous Palace Saloon. Is this true?
 

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By Mick Woodcock

The aim of President Woodrow Wilson and most American citizens in 1916 was to avoid getting involved in what was perceived as another European war. There was no planning or preparation for America to go to war. When war was declared, however, there was an immediate flurry of activity in Washington, DC, to put the country on a wartime footing.
 

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By Bob Harner

The new Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Arizona, Charles Silent, arrived in Prescott from California in February, 1878. The new Territorial Governor, John C. Frémont, arrived from New York in October the same year. Precisely when these two unlikely business partners began to collaborate isn’t clear, but according to the published diary of Lily Frémont (the unmarried adult daughter of John and his wife, Jesse), they were actively engaged in a variety of ventures by 1879.
 

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By Bob Harner

Unless you have researched the life of Arizona’s fifth Territorial Governor, John C. Frémont, it’s unlikely that you’ve heard of Judge Charles Silent. Yet Charles Silent was not only a prominent judge and lawyer in the Arizona Territory in the late 1870’s and early 1880’s  but also a more successful businessman than his better-known partner, Frémont, making him worthy of a closer look today.
 

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By Dave Lewis

Most writings about Ellsworth and Emery Kolb -- Grand Canyon pioneers -- blare the headline:  “THE KOLB BROTHERS.”  True enough, the two famous brothers were the stars of the show, but Emery’s wife Blanche warrants more than an honorable mention for her behind-the-scenes contributions to managing the family business and running a busy household while the boys were away, as they often were.
 

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By Ray Carlson

The Pima Villages were an oasis for southern Arizona in the 1850s.  Thanks to irrigation developed over 1200 years, they had water and ample crops, and the Akimel O’odham [formerly called Pima] had a reputation for being reliable and peaceful.  That peacefulness, though, required being treated with respect.  In the 1850s, the Piipaash [formerly called Maricopa] moved near the Akimel O’odham in order to get protection from traditional enemies.  Three hundred Yuma warriors and allies attacked a Piipaash village and set it on fire.  A distress signal to the Akimel O’odham brought several warriors.

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By Ray Carlson

When one considers people who warranted recognition for their role in the Civil War in Arizona, George Washington Bowie jumps out.  He became commander of the Union forces for the District of Arizona on January 29, 1864. The fort built at Apache Pass was named to honor him, and before being mustered out Bowie was breveted a Brigadier General.

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By Mick Woodcock

In Part 1, last week, we began the story of Russian immigrants, referred to in the newspapers as Molokans, but who called themselves, according to an article in the August 10, 1917 Prescott Journal-Miner, “Holy-Jumpers” or Spiritual Christian Pryguny (the proper Russian term) and disavowed being Molokans.  These were the men whose religious beliefs kept them from registering for military service.  This week we resume the story as the men are reporting to the Federal Court in Phoenix to face the consequences.

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By Mick Woodcock

On May 18, 1917, as the United States geared up to go to war in Europe, President Wilson signed the Selective Service Act, which required young men to register for possible military service.  Some men — for a variety of reasons — resisted.  Among them were the Molokans living in the area of Glendale, Arizona. They were a Christian group who had fled Russia to avoid religious persecution. The Molokans were from a sect known as “Jumpers” for their jumping and leaping during worship.
 

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