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By Dr. Sandra Lynch, Adjunct Curator -- Sharlot Hall Museum

The concept of a museum originated more than two millennia ago with Ennigaldi, a Babylonian princess.  She lived in Ur, in today's Iraq, about 530 BCE (Before Common Era).   Her father, Nabonidus, was the last king of the Neo-Babylonian Empire.   He cared little about governance, which might explain why he was the "last king.”  Instead, his life-long pleasure was digging for artifacts from earlier kingdoms.  He might have been the world's first archaeologist.  

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By Dave Lewis

The people of Hawikuh laid down a line of sacred corn meal and asked the strange men riding strange animals not to cross.  The Spaniards crossed and the battle was on.  Zuni bows and arrows were no match for armored men on horseback with swords and lances.  The proud but half-starved Spaniards swept into the village and feasted on the provisions the natives were laying by in the summer of 1540. 

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The Grand Canyon (not to mention our own Granite Dells and Thumb Butte) used to be in New Mexico; much of New Mexico used to be in Texas; Texas used to be in Mexico.  All of the above used to be part of Spain.  And Arizona didn’t even exist until the 1860s.

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Buckey O’Neill, Yavapai County Sheriff in 1889, led a four-man posse that same year into northern Arizona. It captured four cowhands who’d robbed a train near Diablo Canyon. One of the outlaws, J. J. Smith, escaped while en route to Salt Lake City. Eventually, Smith was recaptured and hauled to Prescott to stand trial. While Smith was loose, the other three outlaws were tried and convicted, but were needed to testify in Prescott and were thus carted up from Yuma.

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By Brad Courtney

William “Buckey” O’Neill is perhaps Prescott’s most famous and revered historical figure. He was also one of Whiskey Row’s most devoted customers and had a knack for stepping smack-dab into the middle of historic events.O’Neill was a natural leader and a nervously energetic go-getter with an ambition that went beyond a run-of-the-mill quest for success.

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By Mick Woodcock

While Arizona had cattle growing, cotton production and other agricultural crops, the state’s biggest contribution to the war effort was copper production. Mines in the southern Arizona town of Bisbee, central Arizona towns of Globe, Clifton and Morenci as well as those in Yavapai County at Jerome and Clarkdale were some of the biggest producers in the country. As early as 1910 Arizona was the leading copper producer in the nation.

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By Brenda Taylor

 “Well-behaved women seldom make history.” This quote is attributed to American history professor Laurel Thatcher Ulrich whose life’s work is devoted to recovering the history of women, a topic rarely featured in history books.  One way the State of Arizona is recovering histories from its amazing pioneer women, as well as its current living ladies, is through the Arizona Women’s Hall of Fame. 

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By Kylin Cummings

The drudgery of ironing was a laborious task that once consumed entire days of homemakers. In the 1950s, a synthetic wrinkle-free fabric called polyester was introduced, saving countless hours for these overworked and underappreciated defenders of the domestic realm. 

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By Mick Woodcock

In Part One last week, we learned something about Amasa G. Dunn, an early Prescott pioneer, businessman and lawman.  In 1869 he had a horrible year.  1870 would be worse.

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By Mick Woodcock

Arizona was a violent place in 1870.  The November 19, 1870, Weekly Arizona Miner detailed seventeen killings around the territory.  One headline, “Out On Bail,” referred to a shooting reported in the previous week’s paper.

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